BUFFERED SHORELINES

 

Buffered shorelines are vegetated areas along rivers and lakes that help minimize the amount of pollution entering the water.

 

Pollution runoff from land is a significant contributor to the decline of our local waters. Buffered shorelines, or buffer zones, help to lessen the adverse affects of human activity on water quality.

 

A vegetative zone consisting of native plants helps to filter pollutants, such as fertilizers and animal waste, and minimizes grass clippings entering the waterways, which rapidly turn into nutrient laden muck.  During a rainstorm, the initial surface runoff, or first flush, typically has the highest concentration of pollution. Rather than directly entering surface water, buffered shorelines capture that initial runoff.

 

 

Keep pollution out of the waterways by adding a buffer to your waterfront property

“Protecting the Waterfront” is one of the nine principles of the Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ program that is designed to protect Florida’s water resources.  Buffered shorelines protect the waterfront by using native and/or Florida-Friendly plants that replace your lawn and eliminate the need for fertilizer and pesticides near the water.  These plants can also absorb nutrients and pollution from stormwater runoff and provide habitat for wildlife including birds, butterflies, and pollinators.

 

Buffered shorelines provide several benefits:

  • Reduces polluted runoff from your yard
  • Reduces irrigation costs
  • Reduces maintenance time (once established)
  • Increases habitat and food sources for wildlife
  • Improve aesthetics and property value

 

Learn more about Florida-Friendly Landscaping™

 

Buffered Shoreline Demonstration Project

With funding from the Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program and Schmidt Marine Technology Partners, ORCA is conducting a buffered shoreline demonstration project in collaboration with the City of Stuart.  ORCA researchers are quantifying the amount of nutrients entering the St. Lucie River from Shepard Park, before and after planting vegetation buffers around drains and along shorelines where runoff was documented.

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Ocean Research & Conservation Association, Inc.

 

Mailing Address: PO Box 4291, Fort Pierce, FL 34948

Center for Citizen Science: 2515 Airport N Drive, Bldg B, Vero Beach, FL 32960

Engineering Office: 140 Tomahawk Drive, Unit 6, Indian Harbour Beach, FL 32937

 

P: 772.467.1600

ORCA is dedicated to the protection and restoration of aquatic ecosystems and the species they sustain through the development of innovative technologies, science-based conservation action and community education and outreach.

 

Please help support our mission.

ORCA is a non-profit, non-governmental conservation organization tax exempt under Section 501(c)(3) IRS. Contributions are tax-deductible.

 

COPYRIGHT © 2018-2021 OCEAN RESEARCH & CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Ocean Research & Conservation Association, Inc.

 

Mailing Address:
PO Box 4291, Fort Pierce, FL 34948

Center for Citizen Science:
2515 Airport N Drive, Bldg B, Vero Beach, FL 32960

Engineering Office:
140 Tomahawk Drive, Unit 6, Indian Harbour Beach, FL 32937

 

P: 772.467.1600

 

inquiries@teamorca.org

ORCA is dedicated to the protection and restoration of aquatic ecosystems and the species they sustain through the development of innovative technologies, science-based conservation action and community education and outreach.

 

Please help support our mission.

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1,500

Connect with ORCA

Ocean Research & Conservation Association, Inc.

 

Main Office:
PO Box 4291, Fort Pierce, FL 34948

Center for Citizen Science:
2515 Airport N Drive, Bldg B, Vero Beach, FL 32960

Engineering Office:
140 Tomahawk Drive, Unit 6, Indian Harbour Beach, FL 32937

 

P: 772.467.1600

 

inquiries@teamorca.org