ORCA Ocean Research and Conservation Association
 
 

WHERE WE WORK

Indian River Lagoon, FL
ORCA's Kilroy™ monitoring networks are designed to track environmental toxin producers (including red tides responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning), invasive species, and watershed pollution threatening public health, fisheries, and other ocean resources.

Kilroy’s design leads directly to more effective watershed conservation action plans. Under our regulatory system, using laws already on the books, a scientifically accurate, legally defensible description of the causes of pollution will mandate a solution to the problem.

ORCA has been working to develop partnerships at both government and non-profit levels to develop conservation case studies where hand sampling and the inability to pinpoint the sources of pollution, have led to dramatically decreased water quality that visibly threatens marine life in the Indian River Lagoon; a cherished, EPA designated Estuary of National Significance.



Chesapeake Bay
The ORCA Kilroys™ were removed in May 2011 due to lack of funds and a lack of support in maintenance cost. Federal and State agencies lack the funds to support our research and implementation of our technology. As a result ORCA depends on donations to support our work. The Bay is literally choking on nutrient pollution from manure produced by factory farms. Three changes to farming practices will achieve at least a 70% reduction in nutrient runoff and yet years after solutions have been suggested none of the Bay states (PA, MD, DE, VA) have enacted a set of policies to end the discharge of nutrients into the Bay (at a proposed cost savings to farmers). Until policy makers and regulatory agencies have the type of conclusive and reliable water quality data that ORCA’s Kilroy™ is designed to provide, appropriate actions cannot be taken to remedy the situation—despite the promise of a dramatic improvement in water quality, a relative ease of implementation and the attention of conservation-minded legislators!


Latest Technology System Deployed in the Choptank River
Ft. Pierce, Florida - May 17, 2010 | The Ocean Research and Conservation Association (ORCA) announced today that it has deployed a water quality monitoring system called Kilroy to determine watershed flow patterns and physical water characteristics from Island Creek into the Choptank River of Chesapeake Bay. The Kilroy system is compiling data for water flow speeds, flow direction, temperature, wave height and water depth.


Real-Time Pollution Monitors to Aid Chesapeake Bay
The Ocean Research and Conservation Association is using new technology in Island Creek and the Choptank River to gather data on water flow that will help show where runoff of sediment and nutrients is most likely to be a problem. That technology also has the potential to identify, in real time, the source of pollution -- possibly down to the farm, development or animal feedlot. Read Article



FUTURE EFFORTS

Under development is the ORCA Land-to-Sea Program™
The ORCA Land to Sea program will use ORCA’s FAST™ program to identify polluted areas of our waterways and ORCA Kilroy™ data to identify the source of the pollutant. Armed with this data, the ORCA Land-to-Sea program will then work with communities, government, agriculture and industry groups to focus on the pollution source and provide solutions to reduce the impact on the environment.


 

 



 

ORCA IS DEDICATED TO THE PROTECTION & RESTORATION OF AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS &
THE SPECIES THEY SUSTAIN THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES
& SCIENCE BASED CONSERVATION ACTION.
PLEASE HELP SUPPORT OUR MISSION.


MORE ABOUT ORCA


"ORCA has a clear understanding of the challenges they need to tackle now, as well as a well thought out plan for applying the technology of Kilroy into meaningful conservation efforts."
-Alexandra Cousteau
Global Water Advocate


Live Kilroy Data
View live, realtime Kilroy data and meterorological data from the Ft. Pierce Inlet, FL.
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DID YOU KNOW?
Studies show that protecting critical marine habitats -- such as coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangroves -- can dramatically increase fish size and quantity.